The Coin 1962

The collection of TV series based on Albert Maltsa’s stories. Action happens at the time of the Great depression.

A Good Day to Die 2010

Interviews and archival footage profile the life of Dennis Banks, American Indian Movement leader who looks back at his early life and the rise of the Movement.

Shock Waves: One Hundred Years After the 1906 Earthquake 2006

This 46-minute film includes dramatic historical footage, colorful animations, and interviews with earthquake experts. The catastrophe of the great 1906 quake spurred a century of progress in earthquake science and engineering. Current and future research includes drilling through the San Andreas Fault at depth in the SAFOD Experiment. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk to yourself and family. Shock Waves received recognition as an outstanding documentary at the 2006 Telly Awards and has been nominated for an Emmy.

Bonhoeffer 2003

Dramatic documentary about the young German pacifist and theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer who resisted the Nazi regime and was hanged two weeks before World War II was over.

More Than a Face in the Crowd 2013

A filmmaker explores the life of her 100-year-old great-aunt, Jane Chung, an actress who made a career for herself at a time when Asian Americans faced widespread racism in Hollywood. Jane has had parts in over fifty films and TV shows including Chinatown, When Harry Met Sally, M.A.S.H. and I Love Lucy, yet most of her roles are uncredited. Through the story of Jane Chung's life and career, More than a Face in the Crowd reveals a larger untold story of Asian American actors and extras in Hollywood.

Young Chopin 1952

As directed by Aleksander Ford in 1952, this Polish-language period drama chronicles the life, times and accomplishments of revered Warsaw-born Romantic composer Frederic Chopin, here played by Czeslaw Wollejko (Danton). The feature focuses exclusively on the youth of Chopin (who died at age 39), spanning his 15th year (c. 1825) through his 21st year (c. 1831); it also depicts Chopin as both prodigiously gifted and one filled with a tremendous spirit of Polish nationalism. Ford concludes with the onset of the illness that eventually killed Ford, set against the backdrop of the famous November Uprising in 1830.

Pompeii: Life and Death in a Roman Town 2010

The volcanic eruption that ravaged Pompeii in year 79 is one of the most famous in history. It is known how its victims died, but how did they live? A new insight into the lives of the people who lived in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius before its cataclysmic eruption.

Terra baixa 2011

The film raises the contrast between the plain corrupted (the Low) and uncontaminated mountain (High Land). The protagonist, Manelic, a simple, primitive, Marta wants to marry a girl from the Low Country that until then had been forced to be intimate with his master, Sebastian.

Dear Censor… The secret archive of the British Board of Film Classification 2011

Lifting the lid on the world of cinema censorship, this programme has unique access to the files of the British Board of Film Classification. Featuring explicit and detailed exchanges between the censor and film-makers, 'Dear Censor' casts a wry eye over some of the most infamous cases in the history of the board. From the now seemingly innocuous Rebel Without a Cause, the first 'naturist' films and the infamous works of Ken Russell, and up to Rambo III, this frank and surprisingly warm documentary demonstrates how a body created by the industry to safeguard standards and reflect shifts in public opinion has also worked unexpectedly closely with the film-makers themselves to ensure that their work was able reach an audience.

Monsters We Met 2003

Monsters We Met is a 3-part documentary produced by the BBC, and later aired on Animal Planet in 2003 under the title "Land of Lost Monsters", with added footage from "Walking with Prehistoric Beasts" and "Walking with Cavemen". The show used computer-generated imagery to recreate the animals that lived during the last ice age and examines what interactions humans had with them.

Iuda 2014

Judas, a seasoned thief, finds himself in the market square where Christ is giving a sermon and his apostles are collecting alms. He follows them and steals their money, only to be caught red-handed. Nevertheless, the Teacher forgives him. What is more, He invites the thief to become one of His followers and offers him a position as the group’s treasurer. Shocked by Christ’s unexpected offer, Judas decides to join the apostles, if only to figure out what is going on. He gradually starts to comprehend Christ’s message, but feels that the apostles are blindly following their teacher. Judas argues with them, and tries to defend his right to divine the truth of God. But when he fails to make them understand, he realizes that Christ’s teachings may sink into oblivion without benefiting humanity. His solution is to betray Christ. “By killing a man, have I not saved a God?”

Toyo's Camera 2009

Even though bringing in cameras to the internment camps was prohibited, one man managed to smuggle in his own camera lens and build a camera to document life behind barbed wires, with the help of other craftsmen in the camp. That man was Toyo Miyatake, a successful issei (first generation immigrant) photographer and owner of a photo-shop in the Los Angeles Little Tokyo district, and of one of the many Americans who was interned with his family against his will. With his makeshift camera, Miyatake captured the dire conditions of life in the camps during World War II as well as the resilient spirit of his companions, many of whom were American citizens who went on to fight for their country overseas. Miyatake said, "It is my duty to record the facts, as a photographer, so that this kind of thing should never happen again."

Gotoma the Buddha 1957

This Indian documentary had its world premiere in Paris. Told simply and straightforwardly, the film traces the life of Buddha, from humble priest to religious icon. The central character's search for wisdom and inner peace may not seem like ideal visual fare, but director Rajbana Khanna makes it so. Emphasis is placed upon Buddha's relationship with the land, conveyed by lyrical shots of India's vast and varied terrain. Prior to its official release, Gotoma the Buddha was feted with a "special mention" at the 1957 Cannes Film Festival; few viewers will hold it in lesser esteem.

The Uprising 1966

After years of deplorable conditions of poverty and injustice, peasants revolt against the landowners, the social elite, and police in this routine social drama. A peasant woman is raped by a lecherous wealthy lesbian, and chaos breaks out in the rural areas where the poor suffer the most from the oppressive social and economic conditions.